Into the Meseta..

Day 25 – Hornillos Del Camino 

Lovely walk leaving Burgos via the urban area surrounding the university gradually becoming an undulating sea of brown. Little to photograph today. 

The Meseta offers the opportunity to converse with ourselves and with other pilgrims. Among today’s encounters were a nurse from Pennsylvania, a couple from Australia, a very nice young man from Italy with one arm, and young lady from South Korea. The most fun encounter was with 5 brothers from Boston (sorry I forgot to get s photo). They have been walking the Camino together for the past three years in two week segments. The youngest was 66 and the oldest 87!! And they were a very funny bunch. 

Stopped at this small chapel with a history of miracles and received a medallion and blessing from one of the nuns. 

Enjoyed a good communal dinner and conversation in the albergue. 

Wandered down the street after dinner and enjoyed the company of a new friend from Mexico who had told me about a little Irish Pub with live music. The local singer was terrific with a voice and style reminiscent of Edith Piaf. ​​


The overnight entertainment was something else in a bunkroom of a dozen beds. One man snoring and his poor daughter trying to wake him each time. And another gentleman with some disorder causing him to utter a variety of uncontrollabled noises from time to time. One of the great lessons of the Camino is the opportunity to practice accepting people as they are. 

Day 26 – Castrojeriz

Chilly crystal clear morning walking through yet more fields of harvested wheat and other grains.  Occasionally a field of sunflowers around and dried still standing looking very forlorn. This area is what we would call high desert with an elevation of 900 meters,  making for clear nights, and hot days in the blazing sun. Fairly easy walking through rolling hills and occasional plateaus. 

Some feel the Maseta is boring and skip it entirely by taking a bus. I am finding beautiful in its own way with occasional surprises to offer such as a very sweet chapel. 

Or the remains of one.Had a delightful meeting walking for an hour today with a Swiss woman and her 12-year-old grandson. She has been walking two weeks a year for the nine years ago starting in Switzerland. There are so many stories reminding me that we each walk our own Camino. 

Once again my German friend Linn has materialized. She was searching for an albergue that was not full or too weird.  She declined an offer from a local to rent a bed in a basement. I gallantly offered to walk her to a nearby church run albergue where they not only had room but the morning wake up is one of the Brothers chanting. 

3 thoughts on “Into the Meseta..

  1. I love your pictures of the “Convento de San Anton”. We met Mau there, he is quite a local character at Castrojeriz. He is Italian, walked the camino 7 times; married a Spanish woman; bought an old house in Castrojeriz and turned it into “Casa del silencio” a mini museum with local artifacts and objects d’art.There is a garden in the back, and he encourages the pilgrims to come in rest, meditate, in silence with soft beautiful Gregorian music in the background.

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